Last edited by Tejinn
Saturday, October 17, 2020 | History

4 edition of Native orchids of Nova Scotia found in the catalog.

Native orchids of Nova Scotia

a field guide

by Carl Munden

  • 271 Want to read
  • 14 Currently reading

Published by University College of Cape Breton Press in Sydney, N.S .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Orchids -- Nova Scotia -- Identification.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. 93) and index.

    Statementby Carl Munden.
    GenreIdentification.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination96 p., [44] p. of plates :
    Number of Pages96
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL22565606M
    ISBN 100920336779
    OCLC/WorldCa41347350

    A guide to finding the native orchid species found in the fields and forests of the Canadian Maritimes and shorelines of the Northern Great Lakes. This work illustrates each species and variety, with photographs, a diagnostic line drawing and a distribution map, as well as a description of the habitat, range, and flowering time. Guest Book; Lady’s Slippers of Nova Scotia. Lady’s Slippers are all Primitive Orchids. that do not produce Nectar, so pollenation is mostly by chance. When pollenation does occurr the seeds will only Germinate in soils with certain Fungi. or their by products present. They are known to live as long as 20 years which does give them a better.

    California Native Orchids View Plain Taxonomic Photo. List taken largely from Calflora, largely without infraspecies or hybrids. Check list for Family Orchidaceae. Add an Observation. California Lady's Slipper (Cypripedium californicum) Status: Native. Last seen Missing: Nova Scotia. Nova Scotia; Newfoundland & Labrador 14 inspiring children's books from Indigenous writers The $50, prize is the richest in Canadian children's literature — awarded annually to the.

    Cypripedium reginae, known as the showy lady's slipper, pink-and-white lady's-slipper, or the queen's lady's-slipper, is a rare lady's-slipper orchid native to northern North America. Although never common, this plant has vanished from much of its historical range due to habitat loss. It is the state flower of : Tracheophytes. As well as our native Mi’kmaq, Nova Scotia’s founding cultures include Acadian, English, German, African Nova Scotian, Scottish, Irish, and American. It’s said that 25 million people living in North America today can trace their families back to Nova Scotia .


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Native orchids of Nova Scotia by Carl Munden Download PDF EPUB FB2

Native Orchids of Nova Scotia: A Field Guide. This book is written primarily for the amateur enthusiast and field naturalist who would like to identify their "find" easily and with the least amount of detective work (that is sometimes the way of more professional books written about orchids).

Native Orchids of Nova Scotia. Carl Munden. Out of Print. This book is written primarily for the amateur enthusiast and field naturalist who would like to identify their “find” easily and with the least amount of detective work (that is sometimes the way of more professional books written about orchids).

: Carl Munden. This latest book on native orchids is a real gem, one of the best -- Systematic Botany A welcome and invaluable addition.

It is the first book that focuses in detail on the extensive orchid flora of these ancient and beautiful southern mountains. But Cited by: 4. Brown’s guide is a must for anyone Native orchids of Nova Scotia book an interest in orchids or the flora of this region. For those not interested in orchids, be warned that this book will go a long way toward developing an interest (some say an addiction) in these fascinating plants.”--David Campbell, professional photographer/5(2).

Nova Scotia is a bit of a hot spot for temperate orchids, with forty species; 39 are native, one was introduced and naturalized (spreading on its own). Amongst the most common locally are the three "red bog orchids" shown at right.

They are common in part because bogs are the most common type of wetland in N.S. and this is a wet province. Shrubs of Nova Scotia. A guide to native shrubs, small trees and woody vines.

by Raymond R. Fielding. Nimbus Publishing & the Nova Scotia Department of Natural Resources, pages. Line drawings, descriptions and keys for species of shrubs "one is most likely to encounter in Nova Scotia".

Native Orchids of Nova Scotia. A Field Guide. Yarmouth, Nova Scotia B5A 4A8 () Millbrook First Nation: Afton Mi'kmaq First Nation: Muin Sipu: Confederacy of Nova Scotia Métis P.O.

Box Barrington Passage, Nova Scotia BOW-1G0 () Native Council of Nova Scotia: Eskasoni First Nation RR#2 East Bay B0A1H0 () Waycobah First Nation. Orchid Society of Nova Scotia. likes 28 talking about this. Welcome to the Facebook page for the Orchid Society of Nova Scotia. Here you can find information about our society (monthly Followers: The description of the showy lady's slipper will be much like that of the yellow lady's slipper except it is considerably larger, indeed, the tallest of our northern native orchids.

Its stout, hairy, often twisted, leafy stalk bears one to three large flowers with a white and pink, pouch-like lip petal. Boneset is normally white and is now Eutrochium perfoliata. Both are lovely, native, and useful in Nova Scotia.

Lobelia cardinalis is not native to Nova Scotia (according to a variety of online range maps), but is a fine garden plant. The Fairy Slipper (Calypso bulbosa) is one of our most spectacular species.

It makes its home in wet coniferous forests and bogs across Canada save in Nova Scotia and P.E.I. Photo Credit: Thomas Sampliner All told 74 native orchid species plus three exotics share this vast and bountiful land with us.

I thought the answer was skunk cabbage, Symplocarpus foetidus, which I thought is found naturally only in SW Nova Scotia but, according to Nova Scotia Plants, also occurs in Cumberland Co.

The skunk cabbage pics at right were taken during a NS Wild Flora Society outing inled by our President, Charlie Cron, who travels to SW Nova Scotia most.

Wild Flowers of Nova Scotia. A couple of week-ends ago we went to Western Head, just outside Lockeport. This was our first time here and I had just found it on Google maps. There is a weather station at Western Head to track the tropical storms and hurricames that come up the Atlantic Coast.

Munden has kept botanical terms toa minimum and has taken pains to exclude various confusing terms, including authorities for species binomials. This book is for the non-professional who wants to know more about the Native Orchids of Nova Scotia. InRobert Lawrence wrote a book titled Start with the Leaves, a beginners guide to orchids and lillies of the Adelaide Bates, editor of South Australia’s Native Orchidsuggested that the next title should be End with the another field guide has not been written but following Bob’s suggestion, it might be interesting to see how far one can go with.

Native orchids of Nova Scotia - A field guide (Munden, ). Habitats considered to be highest-priority areas for visitation generally include wetlands, floodplains, old-growth forests, and regions of calcareous geology (i.e., gypsum and limestone).

The search pattern. --Mid West Book Review "Possibly the most erudite book ever compiled concerning the orchide of the Maritimes A bible for the orchidist to enjoy regardless of the season." --North American Native Orchid Journal a unique field guide that could entice the reader into a vacation trip as unique as the many different orchids found in this region.

"Too many of us only think of orchids as tropical and subtropical plants. Brown's guide is a must for anyone with an interest in orchids or the flora of this region.

For those not interested in orchids, be warned that this book will go a long way toward developing an interest (some say an addiction) in these fascination plants." Book Description/5(2).

Sometimes the media ocean churns up a long-forgotten bit of news jetsam from its briny depths. Such a regurgitation happened recently when this story on Nova Scotia’s scalping law showed up in my newsfeed. According to CBC’s year-old story, First Nations chiefs asked the premier to remove the province’s year-old scalping law from the books.

Orchids of Manitoba, a field guide (2nd edition) Consider giving one to the orchidiphile on your gift list. “It is an excellent book and will provide a lot of enjoyment to those of us who love Manitoba wild plants” (Dr.

Richard Staniforth, Professor Emeritus, Botany, University of Winnipeg). “This book was applauded 11 years ago. Some books he suggests are Newcome’s Wildflower guide, and Carl London’s Native Orchids of NS.

Since Nova Scotia is an Isthmus, and it is relatively separated from the rest of the North American mainland there is very little biodiversity, though we have several biomes.Here are references for, mostly, orchids of North America.

If there seemed to be an area of interest, sources mainly about orchids from other places are also included. Orchids by Country Canada, Native Orchids that Bloom in Nova Scotia this Month; Natural History of Nova Scotia, Volume I: Topics & Habitats.Authors Marian C.

Munro, Ruth E. Newell and Nicholas M. Hill provide a comprehensive catalogue of Nova Scotia’s flora. Illustrated with GIS-generated distribution maps and full-colour photographs, these colleagues and friends offer a series of identification keys, a glossary, discussion of plant communities and a background to botanical study.